Bigger Roots Make Bigger Fruits

The key to a healthy root system starts with the soil, and the key to a healthy soil is having a soil rich with beneficial microbes. 

Lack of balanced nutrition and beneficial microbes in soil results in stressed plants, which attract pathogens and predatory insects.

In order to grow healthy, stress free plants, it is critical to understand what is happening in the rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is the tiny layer between the roots and soil, where all interaction between microbes and plants take place. 

If a plant has beneficial microbes on the surface of the roots and root hairs, as well as inside the plant, it is very difficult for pathogens to set up shop in the root zone and infiltrate the plant. 

The beneficial bacteria produce plant growth hormones and chemicals that help plants overcome stress from droughts, high temperatures, high salinity, solubilization of heavy metals, and so much more through competitive inhibition.

These scanning electron micrographs of 6-week old cauliflower plantlets grown with AgroThrive organic bio-fertilizer (left)  vs. a 6-25-25 Chemical fertilizer (right) show exactly what plant health really means, and why plants need more than just NPK.

 

STIMULATING ROOT GROWTH

These images show the difference in root hair density and length at a microscopic level as a result of AgroThrive General Purpose (left), compared to chemical 6-25-25 fertilizer.

An increased length and density of root hairs allows more surface area for the plants to absorb nutrients and water, which is critical for strong, healthy plant growth.

 

PLANT PROTECTION

​​This micrograph shows a significant increase in microbial activity on the surface of the roots (AgroThrive, left) compared to the chemical fertilizer (right).

Microbes help with plant protection, nutrient conversion, and corresponding nutrient absorption by plants.

This cross section shows a significant increase in microbial activity inside the phloem cells (AgroThrive, left) compared to the chemical fertilizer (right).

The nutrients from the photosynthetic leaves travel through the phloem cells down to the root zone to feed and attract more beneficial microbes that help feed and protect the plant.

They also produce plant growth hormones and chemicals that help plants overcome stress from droughts, high temperatures, high salinity, and solubilization of heavy metals.


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